Lord Street - Southport

Lord Street - Southport

Outline Public Realm Design

The Challenge

SYSTRA were commissioned with Broadway Malyan by Sefton Council to produce an outline public realm design for a key section of Lord Street and adjacent public space in Southport. The proposed scheme is part of a regeneration strategy for the town which SYSTRA also helped to develop.
The regeneration strategy recognises the importance of this section of Lord Street for the visitor economy both in terms of the function it plays to provide access but also as a destination in its own right.

Currently the demands of movement and interchange on the central part of the historically important boulevard undermine the quality of the street as a destination and make moving around as a pedestrian difficult and indirect. SYSTRA identified how access could be retained whilst significantly improving ease of movement for pedestrians and enabling a step change in the quality and attractiveness of this section of street.

Engagement with stakeholders was carried out and the tensions inherent in developing good street design, that balances the needs of all users whilst also creating ‘a place and destination’ was a clear challenge.

SYSTRA’s Role

To address this a clear set of project objectives were established with the Client. A number of layout options, which addressed a range of specific issues, were developed and tested against these objectives. The preferred option was to reconfigure the street by introducing a central median. This retained historic kerb lines but enabled significantly improved connectivity across the very wide carriageway.

The assessment and design work included:

  • A detailed analysis of bus interchange arrangements and movements
  • A review of pedestrian desire lines
  • Assessment of requirements for servicing, drop off and taxis
  • Observations of pedestrian movement and behaviour
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